User preferences rule in UC and C

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Saying hello and asking a busy colleague a question can be easier at the water cooler: both of you are there and visible, and smartphone distractions aside, can talk to each other.
No cheap talk
To get two UC systems to talk, you can spend a lot of time on middleware and APIs, but cost may outweigh business benefit.
Away from the cooler, trying to get a decision or information from someone can be far more difficult. These days, one can play tag over SMS, Skype, instant messaging, e-mail, and several telephone numbers, losing time and one's temper in short order.
But easily finding people on the channel they prefer, at the time you reach out, asking something and getting a response fairly quickly, whatever devices they're using, is one of the major attractions of unified communications and collaboration (UC and C). One example of this is VOIP calling an international colleague, just by clicking on an e-mail, with UC presence information telling you he is available.
With consumer-grade UC tools colonising the workplace, and competing IT priorities, there are a few things to consider before migrating to corporate UC tools.

Saying hello and asking a busy colleague a question can be itweb
easier at the water cooler: both of you are there and visible, and smartphone distractions aside, can talk to each other.

Away from the cooler, trying to get a decision or information from someone can be far more difficult. These days, one can play tag over SMS, Skype, instant messaging, e-mail, and several telephone numbers, losing time and one's temper in short order.

Read the full article at IT Web.

 

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